Wednesday, May 13, 2015

A Guatemalan Spring?

Photo: @PrensaComunitar
Recent protests in Guatemala--organized through social media and that successfully forced the Vice- president to resign--recall the Arab Spring of 2011. Known as the "Land of Eternal Spring,"  politically Guatemala is best characterized by tyranny, violence, and, most recently, narco-fueled corruption. Indeed, Guatemala's political scene eternally teeters on the edge of farce--it would be comedic if it were not so damn tragic in terms of real human suffering.

Francisco Goldman, in his masterful book The Art of Political Murder, shows how political power in Guatemala acts with such impunity as to border the magical realism of Latin American fiction. (Goldman examines the 1998 murder of Bishop Juan Gerardi, just days after the commission he led released a scathing report on military culpability in Guatemala's civil war atrocities.)

Even more bizarre was the 2009 murder of lawyer Rodrigo Rosenberg (see David Grann's brilliant dissection of the case in the New Yorker). Days before his assassination, Rosenberg had recorded a video predicting his death and accusing the then-President and First Lady of orchestrating it. Protestors were on the streets then, too, although in fewer numbers. And, in the end, it turned out that Rosenberg had commissioned his own assassination (in order to shine a light on the corruption coming from the President's office and family).   

Everyone agrees that corruption is a major problem. Indeed, the country considered itself so corrupt that it agreed to charter the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG) in 2007. CICIG, with UN backing, is a body of international jurists authorized to conduct investigations and build cases for charges filed in Guatemalan courts.

CICIG's explicit goal is to dismantle the parallel power structures of organized crime, narco-traffickers, and former military fraternities. CICIG has been instrumental in the arrests of a former president (money laundering), two national police chiefs (corruption), the head of the anti-narcotics agency (drug trafficking), and number of other well-placed officials.

Its latest investigation resulted in the current (2015) protests.

The scandal, known as "La Linea" (see Guatemalan Chimney's excellent overview here) emerged when CICIG announced 47 arrest orders for a massive tax evasion scheme, including superintendent of SAT (equivalent of our IRS commissioner) and the Vice-president’s personal secretary (named as the ring leader of the organization). The group has a special phone number (la linea) to avoid duties and a shell corporation to accept the estimated $130 million in payments for services.

The Vice-president (Roxana Baldetti) and her secretary (Juan Carlos Monzón) were in South Korea at the time of the arrests, and Monzón refused to return to Guatemala.  Wire tap transcripts make numerous references to an unnamed co-conspirator, referred to as “La Número 2,” “La Senora” or “La ‘R’,” widely believed to be Baldetti.

On April 25th massive protests filled the Central Plaza and downtown of Guatemala City, and have continued weekly. Organized through social media, these seem to be largely acephalous and non-violent.  See my thoughts in Jared Goyette's great PRI piece (http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-05-02/guatemalan-spring-youth-driven-protests-demand-president-s-resignation).

On May 8th, to the surprise of many jaded observers, including your correspondent, the normal wall of impunity crumbled, and Baldetti was forced to resign. Presidential elections are later this year; if a clean candidate could capture the energy of these protests, this could be a watershed moment for Guatemala. A new Spring.

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Good Life: What Really Matters | Health and Wellness | Vanderbilt University


LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE INTERVIEW HERE ON WELLCASTS

Ted Fischer, Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies, discusses the “Good Life,” and why it is important to focus on what matters most.

Janet McCutchen:    Welcome to this edition of the Vanderbilt University Health and Wellness Wellcast.  I am Janet McCutchen with Work/Life Connections.  Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Ted Fischer who is Professor of Anthropology and the Director of Center for Latin American Studies.  He also is an adviser to the World Health Organization on well-being.  Dr. Fischer, thank you for participating in our Wellcast.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       I am so happy to be here.

Janet McCutchen:     I wanted to begin by asking you, I think, an important question as it relates to our particular department, Work/Life Connections, as part of Occupational Health.  We are designed to help all of Vanderbilt’s faculty, physicians, and staff reach a better level of well-being. What is the key finding of your cross-cultural research on how to be well?

Dr. Ted Fischer:       Well, that is a great question, and yes, because we so often think about well-being as tied to certain things.  Income is a big one.  “If I made a little bit more money, boy, I could be happier.”  Health is another, and these are all important things.  Income is important, health is certainly important, physical security is important, relationships are important, but beyond that, it is having a larger purpose in life that we are committed to, having a balance between these things, between our work life and our family life, relationships.  Investing time in relationships turns out to be really, really important to our sense of well-being.  So, well-being is more than just not being ill.  It is being well in all of these aspects of one’s life, one’s physical health, one’s mental health, one’s social standing.

Janet McCutchen:     Well, we know that you have done a lot of cross-cultural research, and you have an excellent book, one of several, that is out now entitled “The Good Life.”  What is the good life and
how can we learn to focus on what matters versus just looking at well-being from a quantitative perspective, right?  I live in such and such dollar house.  I need to lose X amount of pounds.  Help us define that from that cross-cultural perspective.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       Yeah, and again a great question because we do so often attach our hopes and dreams to these things, a little bigger house, a little nicer car, and yet often, those are not the most
important things, they are not.  In fact, I can decide they are not the most important things to our sense of well-being.  We do find the cross culture is a sense of dignity and fairness that I am treated with dignity.  In my workplace, I am free from discrimination, but even more than that sort of absence of negative, free from discrimination, people respect what I do.  Whatever it may be, a sense of dignity is really important and a sense of being committed to a larger purpose in our lives, and that can be something very specific of “I am going to master this craft the best that I can be; if I am a knitter, I am going to be the best, I am going to make this design, just the best way that I can;
or, and this is nice for those of us working in either the medical side or the university side, we are part of the larger project, right?  We are making people better, we are building future citizens and leaders,
and so there is something bigger beyond just my weekly or monthly paycheck that motivates me.

Janet McCutchen:     And you found those results as far afield from Germany all the way to the Mayan culture in Guatemala.  Tell me a little bit about that experience. What did you discover?

Dr. Ted Fischer:       That’s right, and so part of the idea behind this research was, “Okay, we all want to live the good life, but we differ and sometimes violently on what the good life is and how best to
achieve it.  What is the path to the good life?”  So, I said, “Well, let’s look at some really radically different places.  The US for sure, but let’s look at Germany, another country, another wealthy country, another developed country, and see what they think about the good life, and let’s look at Guatemala, a poor country, a country inhabited largely by rural Mayan farmers, and what do they see.”  Lots of differences as you might imagine, I mean these are radically different cultures, but I
think what is most interesting are the similarities.  The sense of people aspire to something a little bit better in their lives and those aspirations, being able to cultivate those aspirations, and crucially
believing there is a real chance that I could achieve those, not a guarantee.  I grew up, I might have said I wanted to be the president of the United States, I am not president of the United States.  It is not
in the cards for me now.  So, it is not that you are going to achieve every dream that pops into your head, but you live in a world in which if I work really hard and I am a little lucky and the stars align, this could be achievable.  That is really important for people.  If you feel like you are in a dead‑end job, if you feel like for whatever reason that again discrimination sometimes or just sort of the economic circumstances in which one was born or raised in, if you feel like there is no way out, then it leads to this frustration that can turn into violence and depression and …

Janet McCutchen:     Am I hearing then there is a certain position of hope involved?  So, it is not just a matter of what you think you would like to achieve.  It is having the aspiration, that hope, that sense of possibility, and also having systems and economies that support that.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       Absolutely, and that is a great way of putting it, is hope exactly, that we need to have hope.  I think it is fundamental to the human condition,  this sort of hope, and it is what
keeps us going, yes, and crucially as you said also that there are structures that we would call in anthropology and sociology institutional structures that can help that along.

Janet McCutchen:     So, when we look at this mind-set with respect to wellness and we look at this application to our lives, what is something that we might be able to implement right now to kind of jump start of our own personal journey toward the good life?

Dr. Ted Fischer:       That is a great question.  And of course, we academics, we would like to stay in the clouds and in the ivory tower, not make practical recommendations always, but there are some lessons I think that we can learn.  One is in thinking about going forward in one’s life our plans, New Year’s resolutions, or plans for the next 5 years, or our hopes for children.  It is important for us to step back from the things that might seem so pressing in the moment.  Sure, I want to lose a few pounds; sure, I need to stop smoking; sure, I need to do all of these things; and yes, I am not saying that those are not important, those are really important as well; but it is also important for us to step back and think what is really important in life, right?  What am I going to remember in 10 years’ time?  Is it going to be this little raise that I got this year?  We would all like to have raises, and that is well and good, nothing wrong with that.

Janet McCutchen:     Yes, we are knocking that.  We want Vanderbilt to know.  We are not opposed to that!

Dr. Ted Fischer:       Absolutely.  At the same time, I need to spend more time with my family, and research shows that we remember experiences more than things much more vividly, and so while we might attach our short‑term hopes to that nice suit or dress or that nicer car or these things that cost money, actually in 20 years, we will much more vividly remember that night we stayed up late with the family and watched a movie or played a game or that trip that we took together and did something, and so investing in relationships and investing in experiences is really important and as important as income in many ways.

Janet McCutchen:     Outstanding.  So, not only for our listeners, but evidently cross‑culturally, that is a consistent thing among humanity.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       That’s right.

Janet McCutchen:     That’s a great way to jump start, I think more reading.  You have books out, you have a blog as well, and what is your blog again?  Remind our listeners of your blog.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       They can reach it at tedfischer.org .

Janet McCutchen:     Fantastic.  Thank you so much for your time today.

Dr. Ted Fischer:       It was a real pleasure.

LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE INTERVIEW HERE:  The Good Life: What Really Matters | Health and Wellness | Vanderbilt University

Monday, March 30, 2015

The Happiness Paradox of Latin America

Paraguay can't catch a break.  It is where a 19th century war wiped out half the male population; one of the poorest and most unequal countries in the hemisphere; 60 years of military dictatorship and one party rule, a brief interlude from which ended (kangaroo court style) in 2012.  And it is landlocked. 

Paraguay should be the most miserable place on earth -- and yet a recent Gallop poll shows that it is the happiest, at least in terms of a positive emotional feeling (what we term "hedonic happiness"). 

Highest Positive Emotions WorldwideIn fact, all of the top ten countries on Gallop's Positive Experience Index this year are in Latin America.  Guatemala (#4), Honduras (#5), and El Salvador (#9) all make the list -- and yet this Central American triangle is by far the most violent place on earth right now.  What gives?

If Job were a country, it would have to be Guatemala. This little land (the size of Tennessee) suffers plagues of biblical proportions so frequently as to become mundane if not banal. Seismic instability gives rise to the picturesque landscape, and the lush valleys are shadowed by active volcanoes and lay on top of major fault lines. And, looking a bit beyond the verdant fields and colorful dress of the natives, we find crushing poverty.

The murder rate in Guatemala City is 108 per 100,000; this is twice the rate for Baghdad; the comparable figures for New York and Berlin are 6.5 and 1.5. Over 1 in every thousand people in Guatemala City is killed every year—and virtually no one is prosecuted.

And yet, Guatemalans report high levels of quotidian happiness.  As I argue in my new book The Good Life, this is partly explained through adaptation to circumstances -- our hedonic happiness is relative to the norms of daily life.  We adjust our daily expectations to what is “reasonable” for us and our circumstances, and adapt our daily contentment and hedonic happiness to that norm.  It is also a function of culture, of aspirations and visions of the future.
 
A lot gets lost in translating the lived experiences of wellbeing and deprivation (joy and pain, hopes and fears) into the numerical metrics of such rankings. From an anthropological perspective, what is lost is often what is most important: a subjective understanding of what people value, what their view of the good life is and could be, the pathways they see for realizing their aspirations. Perhaps the subjective aspects of wellbeing are fundamentally different from the more objective and material factors (such as income and health), even if those material conditions partially determine the horizons of one’s aspirations.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Third Wave Coffee: How your gourmet coffee habit affects the livelihoods of producers

Americans are drinking much less coffee than they did in the 1940s and 1950s — down by almost half from a peak in 1946. And such changing trends in Northern countries have profound impacts in the global South where coffee is produced.

The sharp U.S. decline has leveled off in recent years, buoyed by a dramatic rise in specialty coffee (defined as scoring above 80 on a 100 point cupping scale). The very best of these specialty roasts are what the cognoscenti term "Third Wave coffees." (Barista Parlor's Golden Sound coffee shop in Nashville, TN is pictured at right.)

Retailing for $20-$50 a pound (and going much higher), third wave coffees usually come from single farms, with provenance, terroir, and cup quality discussed in the language of fine wines. Coffee's complex flavour profile is especially sensitive to climate, moisture, and soil conditions; and third wave coffees are varietals provenanced from single estates. . . . Read full article on PopAnth here

Friday, March 6, 2015

Happiness Isn't (Just) a Personal Responsibility

In a recent interview on Wisconsin Public Radio, I made the case that our happiness depends on the happiness or the well-being of people around us.  We often think of happiness and wellbeing as an individual responsibility, a view fueled by self-help books and pop psychology.  But actually, wellbeing is tied up with aspirations, morals, dignity and a sense of purpose. In order to feel those things, the right social structures have to be in place.  Read and/or hear the interview here http://www.wpr.org/why-one-scholar-says-happiness-isnt-personal-responsibility

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Is Western civilization a bubble? What can we learn from the collapse of ancient societies?

Arthur Demarest, professor of archaeology at Vanderbilt and a student of the collapse of civilizations, says that in looking at our own society: "we are in trouble." 

Arthur points out that the failure rate for great civilizations is 100%.  It is a question not of “if” but when. He says that an "ideology of long-term thinking and lower expectations — a change in
world 'attitude'— seems to me to be the only way out of the 21st century giant and precarious 'bubble' that now is Western civilization."

Read my full interview with Arthur on the PBS Newshour Making $ense site: The real Indiana Jones on why Western civilization is a bubble

And hear the podcast version at  http://www.tedfischer.org/category/thinktank/ .

Friday, January 2, 2015

Still thinking about your New Year's resolutions? This year, try focusing on the good life

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The end of the year is always a time of reflection of what we have done and what we have left undone. And, of course, it’s time to start thinking about those resolutions for 2015 and what we will do differently.
        Our New Year’s resolutions usually target minor vices – eat fewer snacks, drink less, stop smoking, exercise more – whatever your particular self-admonitions may be. But it is too easy to get lost in the particulars – and in the negatives.
        In setting out our resolutions, we should first step back and take stock of what it is that we really want, what we consider the good life to be, and then think about how best we might achieve it.

Well-being is more than just being well

Fellow anthropologist Arjun Appadurai encourages us to be driven by an “ethics of possibility” – hope, aspiration, optimism – and not just the “ethics of probability” – costs and benefits, risk management, and systematized rationalities. We can be pragmatic, but let’s not allow that pragmatism to kill our dreams of how things could be better.
          I’ve spent the last few years studying what contributes to the good life – the elements of well-being – for folks around the world. I’ve talked to rural Maya coffee farmers in Guatemala and urban supermarket shoppers in Germany, as well as Americans from all walks of life. I’ve looked at notions of well-being in Mozambique, Brazil and China. I found that income is important, but not as important as we might first think. Health and security are also necessary, but insufficient, for living a fulfilled life.
          Well-being, it turns out, is about more than just being well. It also requires strong family and social relations, a sense of dignity in our lives and fairness in our opportunities, and commitments to larger purposes.
           For example Miguel, a 43-year-old Maya coffee farmer in Huehuetenango, Guatemala, I met during my research has benefited in recent years from the boom in high-end coffee in the US. He says that life is good right now – even if we might characterize his circumstances as extremely impoverished. He finds a dignity in owning his own land, in growing quality coffee that commands a decent price. He is committed to providing his children with more opportunities in life, and that endows his hard labor with a larger purpose.
         Such large purposes may take many different forms. German shoppers who buy organic and fair trade products see this as a way of linking consumption to moral projects of ecological stewardship and social solidarity. Mastering a craft, political activism, even religious extremism – all are ways we give larger meaning to life.
          Based on this research, there are some lessons to take away for our New Year’s resolutions. First, we need to ask what is really important in our lives – and how we can align what we do with those values. Then we should commit, or recommit, ourselves to larger purposes that go beyond self-interest. These could be grand (changing jobs to something more meaningful) or modest (cooking more meals at home for the family) — the crucial thing is that they are about more than just getting ahead.


Good experiences make good memories. Maxim Zmeyev/Reuters

Lessons for a happy New Year

In fact, sometimes being less productive economically can make us better off in terms of wellbeing. Filipe Campante and David Yanagizawa-Drott found that in Muslim countries the fasting and observances during Ramadan had a negative impact on GDP growth, but that individuals also reported being happier and more satisfied with their lives. Giving something up for a greater good – and just giving more broadly – is deeply rewarding.
           Second, we should be generous with the time we invest in family and social relations. Material goods usually bring only fleeting happiness, and yet we often pin our hopes and dreams on the accumulation of things we hope will make us happy. Focusing on relationships and experiences adds much more to our long term long-term life satisfaction. Across cultures, we find that strong social relations and the amount of time spent with family are very good predictors of overall wellbeing.
          For many in the US, this means adjusting our work/life balance. In Germany, there is a clear distinction between work and play. Germans are more productive than Americans when at work, but they also work less and guard their time off. At Volkswagen, managers have demanded that Blackberry servers be turned off after working hours so that they will not be expected (or tempted) to respond on their own time. Americans spend much more time at work than in many other industrialized countries – around 1800 hours per year on average, compared to around 1400 hours for Germans. In 1930 John Maynard Keynes famously predicted that by now productivity would be so high, the average work week would be only 15 hours. And yet our material wants have outpaced even our dramatic productivity gains.
          Finally, we should take time to step back from our culture of busy-ness and getting ahead to appreciate what we already have. It may be human nature to want more, but the good life also rests on gratitude and purpose.
The Conversation

Monday, December 29, 2014

Ted Fischer on "The Good Life"

Gratitude and Wellbeing

I heard psychologist Dacher Keltner, a founder of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, on the radio this morning calling for more gratitude as a counterweight to the materialism of the season.The work of Keltner and others has shown that gratitude is closely associated with health and overall wellbeing.
The value in gratitude for our sense of self is related to the sorts of positional consumption arms races that Bob Frank has written about.  (The value of "positional goods" owes more to their scarcity and social identity aspects than to their material properties: the real utility of that $3000 Birkin handbag (to carry stuff around) is about the same as a plastic shopping bag.)  We adapt to new material circumstances quickly and then aspire to more. When I started my career, my imagined dream position was where I am now; and yet, in arriving here, my dreams and aspirations have changed and expanded so that I still fell as if I am missing something in my life.

Such aspiration is important, gives meaning and direction and energy to our lives (as I argue in The Good Life). There is a lot of subjective value in anticipation, as an article in the Atlantic highlights. And yet it can also be a source of constant discontent if not combined with gratitude for what we have. This is a propitious time of the year to think not about what we lack but also what we have--and it is a useful exercise to do this while thinking about what we wanted ten or twenty or thirty years ago.

Research also shows that experiences matter more than things in overall wellbeing--we remember them better and they increase of overall sense of life satisfaction. Psychologist Thomas Gilovich and his colleagues have shown in a number of studies that money spent on experiences (rather than objects) provides more enduring happiness among subjects. As with positional goods, experiences are tightly linked to identity--in many ways our identities are built from experiences.

Stuff is certainly important, but as Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton note in Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending, new-ness wears off quickly and is often followed by disappointment. We need things, but the meaning of things goes beyond their material properties--a thing, anything, also serves as a vessel for our ideas, a container for our hopes and dreams. And our aspirations often give more meaning to objects than they can handle, leading to disappointment.

So, while gratitude cannot replace aspiration, it is a necessary counterbalance for wellbeing.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Third Wave Coffees and Maya Farmers in Guatemala

$500 a pound coffee? Yes, the very best coffees these days are selling for astronomical prices. The $500/lb lot (from El Injerto in Guatemala) was a record, but the Wall Street Journal recently reported on the rising auction prices for so-called Third Wave coffees:
Commodity coffee prices are set by the New York C Price (which, today, is around $187 per hundredweight). But market demand is increasing for the highest quality coffees, those scoring in the upper 80s and above 90 on a 100 point cupping chart. And prices for these beans are rising fast.

Yet, The Guardian says of these new craft brews: "it's pricey, but farmers aren't getting rich." Guatemala is ground zero for the Third Wave coffee boom, and while it is true that farmers aren't getting rich, research Bart Victor and I are conducting shows that these mostly Maya small holding farmers have benefited from the market boom--and have high hopes for coffee. In my new book The Good Life, I look at the lives of these coffee farmers

Still the market is imperfect, and small farmers growing quality coffee often have a hard time selling it as such (rather than to middlemen, who mix it with undifferentiated lots). As The Guardian article reports, "those hoping to change these industries are betting on a mix of direct relationships between farmers and manufacturers, and new business models that help to distance specialty products from commodity prices."

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The Good Life: Page 99 Test

The Page 99 Test blog takes its cue from Ford Madox Ford, who remarked "Open the book to page ninety-nine and read, and the quality of the whole will be revealed to you."

I was asked to apply the Page 99 Test to my new book, The Good Life: Aspiration, Dignity, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing:
          In this era of globalization, of transnational corporations and ubiquitous internet access, it is easy to forget just how different national economies sometimes are—and what we might learn from different ways of organizing markets.
         Germany’s soziale Marktwirtschaft (“social market economy”), also known as Rhenish capitalism, places a greater emphasis on stakeholders . . .   CONTINUE READING at Page 99 Test: http://page99test.blogspot.com/2014/11/edward-f-fischers-good-life.html

Monday, November 3, 2014

Measures for the Good Life: Stated Preferences and the Greater Good

The goal of the economy, politics, and social institutions should be to promote wellbeing among people as broadly as possible. Yet, the questions remain: what exactly is wellbeing? and, How do we measure it for public policy purposes?

Economists privilege revealed preferences (what we actually do) as more true than stated preferences (what we say we want). Yet, as I argue in The Good Life, stated preferences often better reveal our long-term aspirations, desires, and vision of the sort of person we would like to be and the sort of world we would like to live in. Stated preferences often take longer time horizons and are more generous in their pro-social stance.  

An important new paper by Daniel J. Benjamin, Ori Heffetz, Miles Kimball, and Nichole Szembrot (2014) "Beyond Happiness and Satisfaction: Toward Well-Being Indices Based on Stated Preference" makes the case that while neoclassical economics focuses almost exclusively on revealed preferences, in the public policy domain this is impossible as individuals rarely make such choices. They constructed an instrument to measure stated preferences along with subjective wellbeing. By asking respondents to gauge stated satisfaction from alternative scenarios, they are able to measure marginal utility of aspects particular aspects of wellbeing.

It turns out that the eudaimonic aspects (being a good person, living according to certain personal values, having a life that is meaningful) rank among the highest.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Merle Hazard on the Fed's Dual Mandate

Merle Hazard's new single, Dual Mandate, entertains and elucidates as he explains the Federal Reserve's core tension: "Rich folks like to see the currency strong / But the average Joe’s not overjoyed if he’s destitute, and unemployed." Check out the PBS report, with cometary from Paul Krugman and Charles Calomiris, and see the full video: 


Saturday, October 11, 2014

Cash, Credit, or The Good Life

When shopping, we behave differently when we pay in cash versus when we use a card (credit, debit, or gift). This is one of those everyday anomalies that belie our economic rationality, and many theoretical expectations, and yet that make sense. The feel of having cash in hand, the deliberate act of handing over bills, the material loss of paying--the very physicality of the act focuses our attention sharply on price. Using a card is "one step removed from having green cash money leave [your] flesh-and-blood hands," and thus the pain of paying is made more distant, as Ron Lieber argues in the NY Times.

Studies have shown that customers are willing to pay significantly more for the same item when using a card, and that card paying consumers are more concerned with features and quality compared to price. Thus, Dave Ramsey and a host of self-help gurus advise us to use cash as a way of nudging us to be more rational and prudent. Paul Roberts argues in The Impulse Society that credit cards feed into our accelerating desires for instant gratification.

http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=24105But perhaps there is an upside to being less price sensitive (within reason, of course). In my book The Good Life, I look at German shoppers, who still mostly use cash in their supermarket transactions. They often express a preference for products that carry positive social values (organic, fair trade, etc.) and for quality. Yet, when the cash actually changes hands, they often opt for lower priced alternatives. This suggests that paying in cash curbs our enthusiasm for doing the right thing. Perhaps, then, when one can afford it (a separate issue), we would be doing more for the greater good to be less price sensitive--willing to pay for quality and the job dignity and social values that go with it.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Measures of Happiness and Wellbeing


http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=24105Who are the happiest people in the world? In what countries do we find the highest life satisfaction? These are different questions, with different answers. Cheery contentment (hedonic happiness) is not the same as long-term wellbeing (eudaimonia), as I argue in The Good Life.

Martin Seligman, in his book Flourish, writes that "Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, and the other Latin American countries are a lot happier than they should be given their low gross domestic product." High GDP might not guarantee happiness or wellbeing--but it also doesn't hurt as a comilations of wellbeing indices assembled by Korn Ferry shows:  


World Database of Happiness Top Ten:
1.     Costa Rica
2.     Denmark
3.     Iceland
4.     Switzerland
5.     Finland
6.     Mexico
7.     Norway
8.     Canada
9.     Panama
10.  Sweden


The Legatum Prosperity Index
1.     Costa Rica
2.     Denmark
3.     Iceland
4.     Switzerland
5.     Norway
6.     Finland
7.     Mexico
8.     Sweden
9.     Canada
10.  Panama
 
The Legatum Prosperity Index
1.     Costa Rica
2.     Denmark
3.     Iceland
4.     Switzerland
5.     Norway
6.     Finland
7.     Mexico
8.     Sweden
9.     Canada
10.  Panama


And Gallup has a new "Positive Experience Index" (measuring the occurrence of certain positive experiences the previous day) that tilts heavily Latin America:
 
Gallup’s Positive Experience Index
1.     Paraguay
2.     Panama
3.     Guatemala
4.     Nicaragua
5.     Ecuador
6.     Costa Rica
7.     Colombia
8.     Denmark
9.     Honduras
10.  Venezuela
11.  El Salvador

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Downsides to Thrift: Germans Saving Too Much Water

Germans need to flush their toilets more often, says Hans-Jürgen Leist, a scientist at the Ecolog Institute in Hanover, as quoted in a Wall Street Journal article.

http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=24105In my new book, The Good Life, I look at how Germans choose their eggs--and it turns out that their preference for organic and free-range are driven by the same values of thrift and social solidarity that stop them from flushing their toilets. Germans rightly pride themselves on their thrift, from tedious and obligatory recycling regimes to crazy ways of saving grey water, and on their sense of social and ecological obligation ("solidarity" is is a value extolled by the political left and right).

But too much thrift is a bad thing for a water system. With energy efficient washing machines and quest for personal thrift has led per person water consumption to drop by more than 15% over the last 20 years (to 32 gallons/person). At the same time, and based on the same values of thrift and long-term investment, German cities have built up infrastructure capacity.  And, as the WSJ reports, with low flow volumes, sewage systems develop all sorts of problems, from smells to corrosion.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

German Lessons


          

Not so long ago Germany served as a cautionary example for the Anglo-American economies. After the success of the post-war economic miracle (the Wirtschaftswunder), by the 1980s Germany was best known for its generous welfare state, chronically high unemployment rates, and slow growth. Donald Rumsfeld's dismissive quip about "Old Europe" was meant to invoke all these ills and an accompanying political malaise. 


But following the 2008 financial crisis, Germany emerged as a political-economic role model for the world. Policies to cushion workers from layoffs kept unemployment low and consumer demand steady, and the country's long-standing fiscal austerity allowed it to keep its southern neighbors afloat during the debt crisis.  The 12 July Schumpeter column in The Economist reports that businesspeople and government officials from around the world are making the pilgrimage to Germany to learn from its Mittelstand (midsized manufacturers) sector.

In my new book, The Good Life: Aspiration, Dignity, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing,  I look at how the Mittelstand system inspires loyalty and promotes a sense of dignity and security among workers.